Health

5 healthy winter foods recommended by Rujuta Diwekar

Health, according to the World Health Organization, is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity”.[1] A variety of definitions have been used for different purposes over time. Health can be promoted by encouraging healthful activities, such as regular physical exercise and adequate sleep,[2] and by reducing or avoiding unhealthful activities or situations, such as smoking or excessive stress. Some factors affecting health are due to individual choices, such as whether to engage in a high-risk behavior, while others are due to structural causes, such as whether the society is arranged in a way that makes it easier or harder for people to get necessary healthcare services. Still other factors are beyond both individual and group choices, such as genetic disorders.

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It’s easy to nosh on junk food in winter, thanks to the constant cravings. But be a little mindful and indulge in these superfoods instead!

Winter is a time when the temptation to indulge in food remains endless. There’s a plethora of nutritious, healthy, and fresh produce available. And that not just satiates our taste buds, but also adds to the nutrient intake that our body needs to fight likely infections and allergies.

Yes, you tend to gravitate towards that cup of coffee, hot chocolate, or tea to bring you warmth, but don’t forget the goodness that seasonal fruits and veggies can bring to you. Add to that the nutritional value of pulses, nuts, and seeds, which most nutritionists recommend for that winter-perfect diet!

Winters
Cough is common during the winter season so be careful with your diet. Image courtesy: Shutterstock

According to Diwekar, your indulgence platter in winter should include these top 5 divine delicacies:

1. Sugarcane

Calling it “our oldest detox food”, Diwekar says sugarcane rejuvenates the liver and keeps the skin glowing in the winter sun. It is a rich source of natural vitamins and minerals. Have it as juice, and it would be great if you can have it at least thrice a week, Diwekar had recommended in a past Instagram post.

2. Ber

Ber, also known as Jujube, strengthens the immune system, says Diwekar. It is, in fact, great for kids who fall sick frequently. According to the expert, ber also improves the diversity of our diet. Besides that, it is known for improving skin as well.

3. Chincha or tamarind

Diwekar, a proponent of local produce, says tamarind makes a great digestive in itself. Here’s a trick she highly recommends – “The seeds make for a smashing drink when mixed with buttermilk!” Tamarind has fiber, and no fat content, making it great for controlling weight.

Check out Diwekar’s post right here!

4. Amla

Calling amla the “king of winters”, Diwekar says it fights infections. Highly versatile, it can be had by itself, as chyawanprash, sherbet or even a murabba. Also called the Indian gooseberry, this fruit is packed with vitamins C and A, polyphenol and flavonoids. Oh, and in these times of Covid-19 and its Omicron variant, this can be a great diet addition for a boost of immunity!

winters
Don’t underestimate the power of tamarind during winters. Image courtesy: Shutterstock

5. Til Gul

This is a winter delicacy with essential fats, and is great for bones and joints. Til stands for sesame seeds, and that is mixed with jaggery for this sweet delight. These laddoos are balls full of good taste and health.

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