How to curb sugar cravings for weight loss, suggests Rujuta Diwekar

Health, according to the World Health Organization, is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity”.[1] A variety of definitions have been used for different purposes over time. Health can be promoted by encouraging healthful activities, such as regular physical exercise and adequate sleep,[2] and by reducing or avoiding unhealthful activities or situations, such as smoking or excessive stress. Some factors affecting health are due to individual choices, such as whether to engage in a high-risk behavior, while others are due to structural causes, such as whether the society is arranged in a way that makes it easier or harder for people to get necessary healthcare services. Still other factors are beyond both individual and group choices, such as genetic disorders.

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You don’t need to always give into your sugar cravings. Stop a while and see if you still feel like it, suggests nutrition expert Rujuta Diwekar.

The winter season is about all things sweet! The crunch of a chikki or gajak, ‘garma garam’ gajar ka halwa, yummy pinnis and dhodas, freshly oven-baked cookies, cake or brownies and even warm bread puddings…. ah, the list is endless. And so are our cravings. But dear ladies, control! The sugar cravings can go on, but our indulgence shouldn’t.

With rising obesity and diabetes levels, people need to keep a check on their sugar intake. Going overboard won’t help you lose that worrying weight mark on the weighing scale, for sure.

Celebrity nutrition expert Rujuta Diwekar has a three-step, short and sweet formula to help you control for desire for something sugary.

This formula, which she has shared on her Instagram page, will let you know “whether you are actually feeling like a cake/chocolate/cookie or simply giving in to the craving out of habit”.

So, what are these three steps to curb sugar cravings? Come let’s find out!

1. Have a glass of water

According to Diwekar, drinking a glass of water instead of readily reaching out to a dessert can cut those sugar cravings right away. Sometimes, people can mistake hunger for thirst. And more often than not, the foodies reach out for unhealthy options. Once you take a gulp of water, maybe you feel fuller and avoid eating whatever you were tempted by.

2. Eat a fresh fruit

Well, fruits are sweet too. Their natural sweetness and nutrient value far exceeds the sweetness of a loaded dessert. If you feel like having something sweet, make fruits your go-to food. It will satiate your taste buds and sugar cravings to some extent for sure.

Also Read: Did you know brushing after a meal can curb sugar cravings? Sweet!

sugar cravings
Fruits are better to fulfill your sugar cravings. Image courtesy: Shutterstock

3. Defer your decision by 15 minutes

That impulsive plunge into a dessert can be stopped – well, only if you wait and watch. Diwekar suggests you to wait for a couple of minutes before diving into a dessert plate, and the sugar cravings will go away almost automatically. This will be especially useful for those who are making a conscious effort to eat healthy.

We certainly don’t mean you need to give up on all things sweet for a healthy life. In fact the more you try to stay away from it, the more you’re likely to get attracted to desserts. But what you can do is to choose healthier ways to consume sweet.

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